Are HIPAA Changes Coming?

December 18th, 2018 - Wyn Staheli, Director of Research
Categories:   Compliance   HIPAA|PHI  
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On December 14, 2018, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a Request for Information (RFI). They are considering making changes to some of the HIPAA regulations. Earlier this year at the HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) meeting, Roger Severino, the head of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) gave a presentation in which he outlined some possible changes to the HIPAA regulations. This RFI is the first step.

According to the release,“OCR seeks information on the provisions of the HIPAA Rules that may present obstacles to, or place unnecessary burdens on, the ability of covered entities and business associates to conduct care coordination and/or case management, or that may inhibit the transformation of the health care system to a value-based health care system.”

They are seeking input on:

One thing mentioned by Severino at HIMSS was that the OCR was considering requesting information on how some of the settlements and civil monetary penalties it collects can be directed to the victims of healthcare data breaches and HIPAA violations. That topic was not included in this particular RFI, but it might be something to consider when making your comments.

These are all issues that have presented problems and we encourage you to let your voices be heard to make changes that are beneficial to the healthcare community.

Comments are due by February 11, 2019 so if you want to provide feedback, use one of the following and reference RIN 0945-AA00 or Docket HHS-OCR-0945-AA00:

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